Throwback Thursday: What’s a workout, really? Ask this NFL coach.

I really wish I had a baseball-themed post in the can for Throwback Thursday after watching Madison Bumgarner’s amazing performance last night in Game 7 of the World Series. This post from June, in which an NFL coach illustrates what a workout really is, will have to do. Congratulations to the Giants and the Royals on a spectacular series, and to the Giants for a tour de force win to cap off the season.

Inspiration Week! An NFL coach on what a workout really is.

[Originally published on June 17, 2014.]

What is a workout - really? Look below for one NFL coach's thoughts. (Image courtesy of khunaspix / FreeDigitalPhotos.net)
What is a workout – really? Look below for one NFL coach’s thoughts. (Image courtesy of khunaspix / FreeDigitalPhotos.net)

This week, I put out a call to my friends for thoughts that keep my friends going when they’re toughing it out in a workout. I received a gem of a response: this meditation on what a workout really is, from former Washington Redskins coach George Allen.

The link below is from the Championship Coaches’ Network.

What is a workout?

A workout is 25 percent perspiration and 75 percent determination. Stated another way, it is one part physical exertion and three parts self-discipline. Doing it is easy once you get started.

A workout makes you better today than you were yesterday. It strengthens the body, relaxes the mind, and toughens the spirit. When you work out regularly, your problems diminish and your confidence grows.

A workout is a personal triumph over laziness and procrastination. It is the badge of a winner – the mark of an organized, goal-oriented person who has taken charge of his, or her, destiny.

A workout is a wise use of time and an investment in excellence. It is a way of preparing for life’s challenges and proving to yourself that you have what it takes to do what is necessary.

A workout is a key that helps unlock the door to opportunity and success. Hidden within each of us is an extraordinary force. Physical and mental fitness are the triggers that can release it.

A workout is a form of rebirth. When you finish a good workout, you don’t simply feel better, YOU FEEL BETTER ABOUT YOURSELF.

– George Allen, Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee

Ever since watching the implosion of many athletic careers up close during various drug scandals of the last decade and a half, I’ve been careful about not lionizing athletes and coaches as perfectly wise human beings, despite their often-stunning physical accomplishments. Reading up on George Allen this morning, I can tell you that the quote above made my day…and yet he doesn’t particularly sound like he was the healthiest person on earth, with 16-hour workdays and a devotion to football that, according to his children, resulted in a tunnel-vision focus that excluded his family. That just does not feel like a healthy way to live (and yet today we still revere NFL coaches who work so hard that they sleep in their offices).

I often hope for a more balanced world…but I’ve also realized that the one person whose life balance I have complete control over is my own. That is really our call to action in life, to take care of ourselves so that we can do the work of our own days. I do love what the above quote reflects about workouts. I never finish a workout feeling anything other than great.

Well, maybe once or twice I dragged the whole time and was happy to finish. But just once or twice.

One more from NFL world today – a quote on success from Vernon  Davis of the San Francisco 49ers, Peter King’s guest MMQB columnist this week:

If you know the formula to be successful as a football player, you know the formula to be successful after football. You have to be relentless.

– Vernon Davis

Now get out there and get your workout on.

[And back to real time: October 30, 2014]

Yesterday’s Every48 workout: That nice BIKE ride at the gym that I wrote about yesterday, ’cause it was done before 8 a.m. Yay.

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